School of Public Policy Jumps 19 Spots--Ranks in Top Ten MPP Programs in the West in U.S. News & World Report Rankings | Pepperdine University | School of Public Policy

School of Public Policy Jumps 19 Spots--Ranks in Top Ten MPP Programs in the West in U.S. News & World Report Rankings

March 21, 2016  | 1 min read

The Pepperdine School of Public Policy moved up into the top ten Master of Public Policy (MPP) degree programs West of the Rockies, and top five in California in the latest edition of Best Graduate Schools for Public Affairs by U.S. News & World Report, released on March 16. Since the most recent rankings in 2012, Pepperdine jumped 19 spots, one of the largest improvements of the 272 policy programs evaluated in the United States.

 "These rankings tell us two things," said Pete Peterson, dean of the Pepperdine School of Public Policy, "first, the dramatic leap proves the momentum we have been seeing here in our scholarship and teaching over the last several years, and is an encouraging confirmation of our unique liberal arts approach to graduate policy education. The results also show room for improvement in which we have exciting plans to address in the coming years."

The Pepperdine School of Public Policy offers a two-year, full-time Master of Public Policy degree program with its comprehensive James Q. Wilson Core curriculum grounded in both policy analysis and an exceptional understanding of the many factors--cultural, historical, and constitutional--that affect the implementation of public policy. Watch more.

The School of Public Policy also offers joint degree programs in partnership with Pepperdine's top-ranked graduate schools for business, law, and dispute resolution. In addition, this summer the school is launching a four-week, 3-credit Washington, D.C. Summer Seminar, "Roots of American Order: Thinking Historically about Public Policy," where students will engage in a fast-moving conversation about a series of crisis points in American history--each of which re-shaped the relationship between citizens and their government as they re-examined America's Founding Principles.